Author: Aiman

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HOT STAMPING

Nothing says “fancy” like foil stamping, but what exactly is it? Foil stamping, hot stamping or hot foil stamping is the application of pigment or metallic foil to paper using a heated die. The die presses the foil onto the surface under pressure, leaving the design of the die on the paper. Foil stamping, or foil printing is frequently combined with embossing to produce a three dimensional image.

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Types of Foil

There are many types of foil that can make your printed piece pop.

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  • Metallic Foils have a metal-like sheen and a shine or shimmer, and come in a variety of colors, such as gold, silver, copper, green, blue and red.
  • Gloss Pigment Foils have a high glossy, but non-metallic finish and come in many colors.
  • Matte Pigment Foils have a dull finish with deep solid colors.
  • Special Effects Foils such as marbles, wood grains, leathers or pearl add distinctive textures and looks.
  • Holographic Foils use the transfer of a hologram image onto unique foils. Holographic foils add a dramatic effect that often provides a “high-tech” look.

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Benefits of Hot Foil Stamping

  • Greater brand perception: Research shows that by adding gold foil printing or other interesting effects to your piece, consumers perceive a higher value and quality of your product.
  • Attention-grabbing effects: Foil stamping helps make your printed piece stand out from the crowd with its distinctive and eye-catching appeal.

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What can you Foil Stamp?

Foil can be applied to most paper stocks, even magnetic paper. However, the ideal paper stock for metallic foil or other foil stamps is gloss cover or other stocks with a smooth surface. Linen or other textured papers can be a challenge for foil due to their uneven surfaces, as the foil may not look as crisp.

Business cards, brochures, presentation folders, greeting cards, note cards or invitations are some of the endless possibilities that you can foil stamp. Add a touch of class to your marketing materials with elegant and affordable foil stamping.

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Offset Printing Services

Offset Printing Services

Offset printing, also called offset lithography, is a method of mass-production printing in which the images on metal plates are transferred (offset) to rubber blankets or rollers and then to the print media. The print media, usually paper, does not come into direct contact with the metal plates. This prolongs the life of the plates. In addition, the flexible rubber conforms readily to the print media surface, allowing the process to be used effectively on rough-surfaced media such as canvas, cloth or wood.

The main advantage of offset printing is its high and consistent image quality. The process can be used for small, medium or high-volume jobs. There are two types of offset printing machines in common use for publication today. In sheet-fed offset printing, individual pages of paper are fed into the machine. The pages can be pre-cut to the final publication size or trimmed after printing

With the support of our professionals, we have been able to provide our clients Offset Printing Services s per there requirement use for printing brochure, catalog, labels, calendar, books  etc.. These printing services are rendered by our expertise using optimum quality printing material with help of advanced technology offset printing machine.

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Roll Printing Services

Roll Printing Services

Custom roll labels are extremely versatile from print-methods to applications. Print roll labels with 1-3 spot colors for simple logos and text, or print labels in full color for photographs and detailed graphics. We print roll stickers on a variety of stocks; choose vinyl or clear for promotional stickers, or choose foil or paper for product label printing. With perforations between each sticker, you can easily separate your labels one-at-a-time or in strips for easy distribution. When your brand new product is ready for a full production run, PasaPrinting can set up your custom roll labels for machine application. You can’t go wrong with custom roll labels from PasaPrinting.

With the help of roll labels, you can have your products personalized the way you want – bottles, jars, etc.

Our roll label prints have:

  • Different shape options (circle, oval, rectangle, square, starburst)
  • Different size options
  • Different material and finishing options
  • Different wind options
  • Fast turnaround time
  • Competitive prices

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Digital Printing Services

Digital Printing Services

The greatest difference between digital printing and traditional methods such as lithography, flexography, gravure, or letterpress is that there is no need to replace printing plates in digital printing, whereas in analog printing the plates are repeatedly replaced. This results in quicker turnaround time and lower cost when using digital printing, but typically a loss of some fine-image detail by most commercial digital printing processes. The most popular methods include inkjet or laser printers that deposit pigment or toner onto a wide variety of substrates including paper, photo paper, canvas, glass, metal, marble, and other substances.

With digital printing services, you’ll get a fast and flexible digital printing solution that is ideal for jobs that need a quick turnaround. You can also customize your project, choosing from paper stocks in many sizes, including large digital prints, and weights to give your material the high quality digital print it deserves.

Xerox DocuColor® 8080 Digital Press

Our digital printing presses are equipped to create custom materials that match your needs and your budget. Choose the options that are right for you or work with our team of certified designers to develop the best layout for you. We offer options that will maximize your impact with full digital color printing, streamline your message with consistent branding, and add value with little extras like having your digital prints added to CDs, DVDs or online content.

We also offer these other digital printing services:

  • Digital photo printing
  • Digital printing on fabric, including digital printing on T-shirts
  • Digital Screen printing
  • Large format digital printing
  • Wide format digital printing
  • Digital label printing
  • Digital offset printing
  • Digital book printing
  • Digital picture printing

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Graphic Design

Graphic Design

Quality design creates appeal and demand. And we understand that “creative people should be sales people because design is a function of selling.” We produce quality and cutting edge brand and marketing materials to evoke emotion and inspire trust.

Today, there is too much data, so visualization is more important than ever. There’s a reason why Pinterest, Instagram, and Tumble took off. Our experience includes a variety of marketing and advertising assets, in both digital and print media, such as…

  • Info-graphics
  • Postcards
  • Business Cards
  • Advertisements
  • Brochures
  • Event Banners
  • Sales / Data Sheets

Your marketing needs are as unique as your business. Graphic Design is more than just an attractive logo, brochure or website. Generate the right message; communicate it through the right medium; punctuate it with professional graphic design.

 

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Offset Printing History

Offset Printing History

Offset printing is a commonly used technique in which the inked image is transferred (or “offset”) from a plate to a rubber blanket, then to the printing surface. When used in combination with the lithographic process, which is based on the repulsion of oil and water, the offset technique employs a flat (planographic) image carrier on which the image to be printed obtains ink from ink rollers, while the non-printing area attracts a water-based film (called “fountain solution”), keeping the non-printing areas ink-free. The modern “web” process feeds a large reel of paper through a large press machine in several parts, typically for several meters, which then prints continuously as the paper is fed through.

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What’s Next

What’s Next

What’s Next?.. what is the future of printing

What could arguably be deemed the strongest of the printing industry trade associations is now surveying its members, asking them to describe whether the future of “print” is grim or bright.

They will get a wide range of responses, and setting aside the value of reporting to their members what those members already think, the question itself is much too broad. Instead, I’d like to propose a series of different questions that cut to the core. Here they are:

  • What is the future of print as a process?
  • What is the future of print as a medium?
  • What is the future of print as a business model?
  • What is the future of print as an industry?
  • What is the future of print as a trade association?

The Future of Print as a Process

Print as a process has a bright future because our industrialized society continues to “mark on substrates.” For most of us, that means applying text and images (often together) to paper and other substrates for a wide variety of purposes. The versatility and diversity of applications guarantee that “print” will thrive. Certainly digital technology will displace some uses of print. However, many of those printed products whose demise has long been a foregone conclusion refuse to vanish. From the telephone directory to the lowly business card, there are applications for which print remains competitive with any digital alternative. While offset lithography is diminishing, inkjet and other digital imaging technologies are delivering the same sorts of printed products which are fulfilling the same applications. Will overall demand continue to trend downward? Certainly. Will pricing pressure continue as demand falls? Absolutely. But will print as a process vanish? I wouldn’t bet on it.

The Future of Print as a Communication Medium

Print as a communication medium is certainly diminishing. Newspapers are the sharp point of that spear. Magazines and other periodicals have declined more slowly, because even younger readers often prefer the tactile experience and all the other characteristics of print. The print v. digital discussion often misses attributes of print that help it resist erosion. Print is self-archiving. Print requires no external power source. Print requires no separate device with which to interface. Print is easily and inexpensively replaceable if damaged or lost. Print requires no learning of a user interface beyond a third grade education, which is where most of us really began learning to read with comprehension. Print’s chief disadvantage is distribution. And its future as a communication medium is largely tied to the fortunes of the USPS. When distribution is simply far too expensive to sustain, print declines. And every USPS rate case which has raised periodical and standard mail rates has been mirrored by a decline in print volume. Will print as a medium vanish? That’s also very unlikely. For certain purposes, print’s effectiveness will be worth its expense, even with the distribution challenge it faces. Direct Mail marketing is proving that every day.

The Future of Print as a Business Model

The future of print as a business model is a more interesting and pertinent question. For nearly a century, nearly all printing firms have had parallel business models. Commercial print as a stand-alone business emerged as newspapers ceased being the community provider of print other than their own publications. And commercial printers have nearly identical “job shop” business models. I’d argue that the business model itself is creating the most pain. In fact, it is the job shop business model that creates too little customer value to remain viable and relevant even while print as a process and print as a medium retain a good deal of viability. The “job shop” business model has four simple components: sell it, make it, ship it, and bill for it. Inevitably, that’s led to businesses with very simple business structures: sales, manufacturing, distribution, accounting. While many printing industry firms have grown enough to add other functional departments, those four remain the core elements of their business models. And that business model is turning into a sea anchor for far too many. The job shop business model relies on winning the opportunity to do what someone else has already determined needs doing. That means selling is all about capturing existing demand. If demand is diminishing, the job shop business model has nothing to say and no means to respond. Because nothing about it is focused on creating new demand where none existed before. So the viability of the commercial printing business model is under the most direct threat of irrelevance and obsolescence. The great good news is that those legacy printing companies who have recognized this threat and altered their business models (which is much more than offering new products and services) are creating strong and sustainable futures for themselves. They just don’t define themselves as “printing companies” any longer.

The Future of Print as an Industry

What’s the future of print as an industry? If “an industry” is defined as a large number of companies structured almost identically and offering the same products and services, then the “printing industry” is seriously threatened. Every successful business strategy is based on differentiation. Success depends on being and acting different than one’s competitors. When it is more and more difficult to compare a company with others, a sustainable competitive advantage for that company is usually growing. But if we pair that kind of change with the declining viability of the job shop business model and displacement of some print by digital alternatives, an industry of “printing companies” will continue to shrink and ultimately vanish. That doesn’t mean that the companies themselves or the great people in them will disappear. Rather, it means that those firms simply won’t be “printing companies” any longer. They will be something else, most likely many different “something elses.” And that’s a great thing.

The Future of Print as a Trade Association

So, what’s the future of print as a trade association? That’s perhaps the most immediately pertinent question. An “industry” of “printing companies” is being deconstructed as many of those companies reinvent themselves (many defining themselves as part of their customer’s industry segments). As that happens, the future for trade associations becomes murky indeed. When the member business models aren’t almost identical, and their needs are no longer at least parallel (if not uniform) then any association is hard pressed to create meaningful value for a broad enough swath of member companies to sustain itself. Let’s face it: association members remain members when sufficient value is being created for member companies, their owners, and their employees. But when the needs of the members are sufficiently diverse, an association cannot create services and programs with an appeal broad enough to attract member participation and loyalty. And that’s what’s facing the the legacy printing associations now. Legacy printing associations are having a harder and harder time retaining members.

Attendance at meetings and conferences is declining. Participation in educational programs of all kinds is more and more difficult to sustain or build. It’s easy to blame those trends on the decline in the number of “printing establishments” or declining demand for print and the financial condition of printing companies. However, association programs intended to help member companies do more of what they’ve always done (selling, manufacturing, distributing, and accounting) are as much the problem. Take selling and marketing as one good example. Most conference presentations on sales and marketing are still focused on capturing existing demand. Very few of them even mention creating demand. Fewer still deal with methods to discover what customers want and need, and then develop services to fulfill those wants and needs. So, if demand for print is declining and demand capture isn’t working well, then learning how to do better what’s already not really working isn’t helpful. And association members know it. Owners of member companies tend to be bright folk. When association offerings aren’t speaking to what association members are having to face and to do, it’s easy to understand why those owners look elsewhere for actionable information and help.

Creating a Future for Print?

Two of the fastest ways to see a viable strategy are to look at the business model, and to look at how a company behaves with its customers. So don’t claim “transformation” if your business model is still based on “selling-making-distributing-billing” that which someone else has already decided to do. Don’t claim transformation if you’re fielding a sales force only equipped to capture existing demand. Real marketers do neither. And those are the firms that are growing.

Printing

Printing

The Future of Print as a Process

Print as a process has a bright future because our industrialized society continues to “mark on substrates.” For most of us, that means applying text and images (often together) to paper and other substrates for a wide variety of purposes. The versatility and diversity of applications guarantee that “print” will thrive. Certainly digital technology will displace some uses of print. However, many of those printed products whose demise has long been a foregone conclusion refuse to vanish. From the telephone directory to the lowly business card, there are applications for which print remains competitive with any digital alternative. While offset lithography is diminishing, inkjet and other digital imaging technologies are delivering the same sorts of printed products which are fulfilling the same applications. Will overall demand continue to trend downward? Certainly. Will pricing pressure continue as demand falls? Absolutely. But will print as a process vanish? I wouldn’t bet on it.

History of Printing

History of Printing

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Folding & Pasting

Folding & Pasting

Pasa Printing’s after print services include high-speed folding options for your brochure, flyer or other document. We can machine or hand fold just about any document into just about any format. Contact us today for details and a free estimate.

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Some of our more popular folds include:

 

folding-options

 

No matter what kind of fold your project requires, PasaPrinting can do it.

Feel free To contact us any time

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